Daily Archive: April 4, 2018

New study suggests tens of thousands of black holes exist in Milky Way’s center

A Columbia University-led team of astrophysicists has discovered a dozen black holes gathered around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The finding is the first to support a decades-old prediction, opening up myriad opportunities to better understand the universe.

From car engines to exoplanets

Chemical models developed to help limit the emission of pollutants by car engines are being used to study the atmospheres of hot exoplanets orbiting close to their stars. The results of a collaboration between French astronomers and applied combustion experts will be presented by Dr Oliva Venot and Dr Eric Hébrard at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) 2018 in Liverpool.

Giant clue in the search for Earth 2.0

In a new study published today in the Astrophysical Journal, researchers from New York University Abu Dhabi and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA, share new findings about how the presence of “giant” planets (between 10 and 1000 times as large as the Earth) affects potentially habitable neighbors that would be discovered with the next generation of ground-based and space-borne telescopes.

Video: The sweet smell of life support

When NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren blasted off from Kazakhstan in July of 2015 for his first expedition aboard the International Space Station, he had some lofty expectations:

Did you know that a satellite crashes back to earth about once a week, on average?

This past weekend, a lot of attention was focused on the Tiangong-1 space station. For some time, space agencies and satellite trackers from around the world had been predicting when this station would fall to Earth. And now that it has safely landed in the Pacific Ocean, many people are breathing a sigh of relief. While there was very little chance that any debris would fall to Earth, the mere possibility that some might caused its share of anxiety.

Supercomputer simulations shed light on the heliospheric interface

“Three-dimensional Features of the Outer Heliosphere Due to Coupling between the Interstellar and Heliospheric Magnetic Field. V. The Bow Wave, Heliospheric Boundary Layer, Instabilities, and Magnetic Reconnection” originally appeared this past August in the Astrophysical Journal, a publication of the American Astronomical Society. But the paper, whose co-authors include two researchers at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), has recently received renewed attention thanks to its unique insights into physical phenomena occurring at the heliospheric interface.